The firm had a long reputation as a manufacturer of precision optical glass used in the world’s finest optics, and the U.S. military had often expressed interest in a domestic source for high quality glasses required for defense purposes.

The summer of 1969 was notable for several significant events, including the moon landing and the Woodstock Festival of Peace and Music; Sesame Street debuted, and Richard Nixon was sworn in as president. Amid these historic happenings, SCHOTT North America opened its factory in Duryea.

The firm has grown i size and stature from 55,000 square feet to more than 200,000 square feet today and from less than $2 million to more than $50 million in sales over that time span. July 1, 1969 marked the first optical glass melt at the new factory. Since then, many developments have fostered growth and stature within the local and optical communities. Three keys led to the establishment and subsequent growth of the firm:

• The foresight of SCHOTT’s management in Germany to act on the obvious demand for a US presence at the urging of the United States military.

• The support of the local business community, especially the Greater Pittston Chamber of Commerce, in securing and preparing the Duryea site for construction of the factory.

SCHOTT had long enjoyed a reputation for manufacturing precision optical glass used in the world’s finest optics, and the U.S. Air Force was interested in securing domestic production of this key material. The realization of this came together with the Incorporation of Schott Optical Glass Inc. in 1967. Construction of the factory commenced in 1968 and continued through summer 1969. The original factory was a miniature version of the firm’s parent company in Mainz, Germany and was outfitted to produce the highest quality optical glass.

Then, in 1970, SCHOTT acquired the business that would become its Ophthalmic Division from PPG Industries and instantly became one of the world’s leading manufacturers of glass for spectacle lenses. This led to a number of innovations in the Duryea R&D laboratory, including lightweight glasses for thin eyeglass lenses and colored glasses for popular sunglass brands.

Research and development has always been a core ingredient for the site’s growth. In fact, Industrial Research Magazine has recognized the company for its developments in the fields of fiber optics, ophthalmic glass, and laser glass. These early successes formed the impetus to build a state-of-the-art research and development wing in 1982. Today, in addition to supporting the SCHOTT Advanced Optics Business Unit, this laboratory also serves all SCHOTT’s North American facilities.

Initial production consisted of both continuous and discontinuous melting operations. Recently, glass melting has been restricted to discontinuous, individual batch melting processes, while glass processing has been expanded to include precision finishing and coating operations.

The markets for laser glass and infrared transmitting glass are primarily located in the United States, hence SCHOTT has selected the Duryea site as the location for manufacturing these unique products. Both product lines form an integral part in the continuing growth plans for SCHOTT’s Advanced Optics Business Unit.

Laser glass, in particular, has a long history of fostering innovation within the international optical community. SCHOTT has supplied glasses for the major research lasers in the United States and worldwide. The first laser glasses were developed in the early 1960s for powerful lasers being developed by the U.S. government. With names like Shiva, Novette and Nova, the programs invoked mythical names. They culminated in the construction of the National Ignition Facility, which is simultaneously the world’s largest laser and precision optical instrument. The goal of all of these programs was to achieve nuclear fusion by using laser beams to confine reactions within the target chamber. The ultimate aim is to produce power, the by-product of which is ordinary water.

The firm has also developed laser glasses for other applications, such as range finders and medical lasers used in ophthalmic and cosmetic fields. The primary active “ingredients” for these products are the rare earths, neodymium and erbium.

Compared to laser glasses, which have a long history at SCHOTT Duryea, infrared transmitting glasses are a relatively recent addition to the site’s product offering. These glasses, primarily from a glass family called “chalcogenide” glasses, are remarkable for excellent light transmission in the infrared region of the optical spectrum. Such light rays are invisible to the human eye. However, this invisible “light” is important in the fields of sensors and photography.

Early glass fabrication was limited to rudimentary cutting, grinding, and polishing, primarily for inspection purposes. Today, the facility possesses ultra-modern equipment capable of producing precision polished and coated surfaces. This is achieved using various cutting, grinding, drilling, CNC machining, polishing and coating equipment.

The company manufactures and processes pieces of glass that weigh anywhere from a pound or two to mammoth pieces weighing several tons and requiring specialized lifting and transporting equipment, such as overhead cranes and high capacity lifts.

At various times during its 50-year history, SCHOTT Site Duryea has focused on many areas of activity. Despite technological advances and maturing of markets, classical optics – glass for lenses, prisms and windows – remains an important part of the product portfolio. The company has endured some bumps in the road, most notably a devastating fire that destroyed a significant portion of the plant in 2015. However, the few setbacks have served as incentives for positive developments of leading edge products and investments in personnel and equipment.

With 50 years of growth and success under its belt, the firm is poised for propulsion into the next fifty years of expansion and progress.

WILKES-BARRE — Frank Bartoli, executive director at NEPA Inclusive, has worked for years to create and support inclusive and sustainable lives for people with disabilities.

Bartoli said the White Haven State Center is an institution and no matter how you craft the language around it, it is a large congregate setting reserved only for people with intellectual disabilities.

“We, as a society, no longer view institutions as an acceptable form of care for people with disabilities,” Bartoli said. “Placing people with disabilities in large segregated settings violates their civil rights and is not a human way to treat people with disabilities. They deserve better. They deserve to be treated with more respect and dignity.”

Bartoli is passionate about this issue. Bartoli has spent many years in advocacy and services for people with disability and he has raised his daughter with Down syndrome who is now 21 and just received her waiver for services.

“Today, she is a former homecoming queen and basketball manager of her high school girls basketball team,” Bartoli said. “She graduated high school with honors with distinction. She has attended the (Wilkes-Barre Area) Career and Technical Center to learn audio-visual and has used OVR (Office of Vocational Rehabilitation) services to train to be a photographer.”

Bartoli said his daughter, Ellie, trained for two years as an administrative assistant through her high school’s Transitional Employment Program at the Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Commerce. She just recently started her first job at a law firm.

Early in life, she attended YMCA and other community programs and was included in her public school classrooms. She took pictures of the Little League World Series Challengers Teams and Reggie Jackson as part of WVIA’s team during her OVR work experience.

“This is the same person who 50 years ago would have been directed to the White Haven Center to live out her life in a segregated state-run large institution,” Bartoli said. “She would have had none of these opportunities.”

Bartoli had this to say for those who say “but your daughter is different,” or “she isn’t like someone else who is in White Haven Center.”

“Let’s be clear,” he said. “She would not be the person she is today if not for the education and support services she has received in the community and there are many people just like her who have been at White Haven Center and maybe some that still are.”

Bartoli said for those who have significant medical needs, there are facilities and services available in the community system.

“There isn’t one person who is in a state center who cannot be cared for in the community setting,” Bartoli said. “This is not a local issue — it’s a statewide and national issue. The days of state-run institutions are dwindling. We are trending now toward inclusion.”

Bartoli said employees at White Haven will have jobs and with the savings realized by closing White Haven, more people in need will be removed from waiting lists.

Bartoli said there are 35,000 people in the community system with ID waivers and another 13,000 waiting for ID waivers. That’s not counting those with autism who have an autism waiver, or those who are not diagnosed and living in the community. There are 700 people remaining in state centers, including 112 at the White Haven Center.

Bartoli said as those who reside at White Haven decreases, it has become an unsustainable model of support.

“I feel for those who disagree with the closure,” he said. “I respect their opinions. I just happen to disagree with their position.”

Bartoli said there are some 13,000 people waiting for services who need them. So how do we provide them to those people who are also aging and need help?

“We need to look to ways to be able to support everyone who needs our support and we need to welcome these individuals into our communities and support them in the best way we can,” Bartoli said. “For the employees, we can help them obtain jobs in the providers who will be accepting people leaving White Haven Center. They will also be offered other state jobs through the state union contract requirements.

“We all know and accept that the care at White Haven is good and the employees and families are good people. But this isn’t the same issue as closing a prison or a [Department of Veterans Affairs] hospital. This is a human rights issue.”

WILKES-BARRE — Who wants to share a sardine sandwich with me? Or a stick of pepperoni? Or some oyster stew?

Oh sure, dad loved his roast beef dinners with mashed potatoes and corn or green beans, or a juicy ham, or a nice big roasted turkey to carve.

The sardine sandwich was made with bread and butter, some sliced onion, salt and pepper and ketchup. Dad absolutely loved them. I couldn’t get past the smell, although I did take a bite one time and, to be truthful, it was my last taste of dad’s beloved delicacy.

I did take the concept a bit further though — buttered bread, onion, bread and butter pickles, no sardines, and yum, a great sandwich. I sometimes add a slice of cheese and light salt and pepper.

Pepperoni is another favorite I shared with my dad. Leave the skin on, he would say. Maybe some potato chips too. And always, ice cold beer. Only one, he would tell me — for him, none for me.

Now let’s move on to the oyster stew. Mom would make it and she would put a lot of oysters in it. She would serve it with a dollop of butter in the middle. Dad would add salt and pepper.

I challenge you to find oyster stew today — anywhere. There was a stand at the Bloomsburg Fair for years that served great oyster stew. That guy han’t been at the Fair for years. Campbell used to sell oyster stew in a can, but that has disappeared from the shelves. And you never see it offered on restaurant menus anywhere.

Anybody with a recipe — it can’t be that difficult — please email it to me. I will try to make it and let you all know.

All these things came back to me in recent weeks when I spent so much time in my hometown of Plymouth with The Wall That Heals and the Kielbasa Festival. We had several conversations of the snacks our parents used to make and eat — most awesome, some not so good, like sardine sandwiches.

There was a lot of talk about the toughness of the soldiers who served our country, my dad included. Guys who would lay down their lives for their country and for us and those that returned became valuable contributors to their communities.

And they ate snacks like sardine sandwiches because they had the cast-iron constitution that we kids had to train for by daring to try the same foods.

My dad also liked things like ice cold buttermilk with salt and pepper. He used it to wash down hard boiled eggs and Spam sandwiches, not to mention occasional scrapple and egg breakfasts.

This was what guys like my dad enjoyed. But how many of these delicious items are still enjoyed today? If you know, please tell us because we want to go there.

Talking about these things kind of added to the celebration of patriotism that enveloped The Wall That Heals. It was nearly a week of visitors — an estimated 15,000 — walking into Huber Field and paying respect to the names on The Wall and to all veterans — especially those who died in battle.

The Wall brought honor to the Vietnam-era soldiers — something that didn’t follow most of them home from the jungles of Vietnam. It took far too long for America to fully appreciate the Vietnam veterans and to honor them for their service to their country — to all of us.

And it was really refreshing to see so many students visit The Wall and take the tour and listen to the stories of Vietnam. The students really learned and because of that, they earned respect for Vietnam veterans and for all veterans of all wars.

And that is good. We need to perpetuate those stories so that this generation and generations yet to come can appreciate all that was done and sacrificed for them and their country. The lessons learned will galvanize the spirit of patriotism in America forever.

And if these generations can learn the value of sardine sandwiches, pepperoni and potato chips and oyster stew, well, all the better.

Maybe they will understand why millions of men and women — at the time of war, not much older than the students themselves — ran onto beaches under heavy fire, sweated in the jungles, and braved cold winters to fight for us.

Reach Bill O’Boyle at 570-991-6118 or on Twitter @TLBillOBoyle, or email at boboyle@timesleader.com.

WILKES-BARRE — The Wolf administration announced last week that it has received $20 million in federal funding from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to continue the Money Follows the Person (MFP) grant.

MFP incentivizes states to focus on transitioning individuals out of long-term care facilities to be served in their communities in a residence of their choice.

“My administration firmly believes that all Pennsylvanians should have the opportunity to live in the community among family and friends and still receive services necessary to live a healthy, independent, and productive life,” Wolf said. “The Money Follows the Person grant allows ​Pennsylvania’s Department of Human Services ​(DHS) to help thousands of Pennsylvanians live fulfilling, everyday lives in their communities.”

Pennsylvania has participated in MFP since 2008, and awarded funding is used primarily to expand home and community-based services, which allow people with long-term care needs to live in their own home in the community closer to family and friends and provides more opportunities for recreation, work, and independence.

Since 2008, MFP has helped Pennsylvania transition more than 4,000 individuals from nursing homes, private intermediate care facilities, and state centers to the community. DHS has used MFP funding to strategically invest in initiatives focused on housing, services for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities and autism, and quality of care and opportunities for those served in the community.

“The Money Follows the Person grant money makes the work the department does every day possible,” said DHS Secretary Teresa Miller. “We are grateful for the federal government’s continued support toward this important work.”

• Partnering with the Pennsylvania Department of Aging on expanding the Shared Housing and Resource Exchange (SHARE) housing pilot: First launched in 2016, SHARE helps match senior homeowners and home seekers to increase opportunities for affordable housing options for seniors and seniors with disabilities. SHARE was first launched in Pike, Monroe, and Wayne counties and now will be expanded to nine other counties.

• Supporting community-based housing opportunities for veterans experiencing homelessness or living in restrictive settings through the Fairweather Lodge Program: The Fairweather Lodge program is helping veterans who were homeless or in a restrictive setting and have been diagnosed with mental illness to integrate into the community by providing a place to live, employment, peer support, and skill building.

• Strengthening and simplifying service delivery for people with intellectual disabilities and autism: DHS’ Office of Developmental Programs will work with stakeholders and key partners to re-imagine operational processes so individuals with an intellectual disability or autism and their family may better coordinate services and receive more support in service planning and managing services received.

• Building capacity to support clients with co-occurring health needs: In 2016, DHS’ Office of Developmental Programs and Office of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services launched an initiative to better support individuals with intellectual disabilities and co-occurring behavioral health needs outside of institutional settings. More than 50 professionals in the intellectual disability/autism and mental health fields are convened annually to identify system issues and be trained in clinical best practices. This effort has also produced a conference series to further educate providers on needs of individuals with dual diagnoses and an online curriculum to help Pennsylvanians with dual diagnoses.

• Supporting employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities: There are individuals with disabilities who live in a community-based setting who would like to obtain competitive integrated employment. However, they may not be aware of opportunities and support available to gain employment or may fear losing access to needed services. DHS will partner with advocates on a campaign to educate people on how they and can obtain or maintain employment and maintain current services.

• Promoting safe and high-quality services in the community: DHS will strengthen mortality review processes for people who die while receiving services in their community through a waiver program to collect data and analyze risk factors to identify suspicious and avoidable deaths. This will help identify safety issues and improve outcomes for those to live in the community.

Federal funding for MFP is set to expire in September 2020. The United States House of Representatives passed House Resolution 3253 in June 2019, which would extend the MFP program through September 2024.

On the 18th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terror attacks, the U.S. Senate has spoken with one voice honoring the heroes of that horrific day.

A bipartisan resolution offered by Senators Pat Toomey, R-Lehigh Valley, Bob Casey, D-Scranton, and Mark R. Warner, D-Virginia, that commemorates the historical significance of the Sept. 11 National Memorial Trail (NMT) has been unanimously approved by the Senate.

The Sept. 11 NMT is a 1,300-mile network of roads and paths that connect the Pentagon Memorial (Arlington, Va.), the Flight 93 National Memorial (Shanksville), the National Sept. 11 Memorial and Museum (New York City), and the 9/11 Memorial Garden of Reflection (Yardley). The NMT also passes through parts of Maryland, West Virginia, New Jersey, and Washington, D.C.

Sen. Toomey: “On Sept. 11, we remember the atrocities that were brought upon our country. We remember the lives lost and the destruction that was caused. But we also remember the heroes. The first responders that raced into burning and collapsing buildings, the communities that came together to donate food, blood, and money. And we remember the exceptional bravery of those aboard Flight 93. The Sept. 11 National Memorial Trail serves as another tribute and remembrance of that fateful day and it’s fitting that the Senate came together to unanimously approve this measure.”

Sen. Casey: “Today, we remember the lives lost 18 years ago on Sept. 2001. We must honor those who showed valor and courage, like the heroes on Flight 93 and the first responders who risked their lives to save others in New York and Washington. Their acts of selflessness and bravery in the midst of that day’s attack united us as a Nation, and continue to inspire us to defeat those who invoke terror on the world. The Senate’s passage of this measure is a fitting way to honor that selfless legacy for years to come.”

Sen. Warner: “Virginia and our nation will forever remember the events of September 11, 2001. While we can never repay the sacrifices of our first responders or their families, the September 11th National Memorial Trail provides an opportunity for every American to remember the courageous individuals who sacrificed so much that day.”

The Pennsylvania Commission for Women last week announced it will be hosting a series of salary negotiation workshops for women across the commonwealth.

The initiative is made possible through a partnership with the American Association of University Women (AAUW) and its Work Smart program. The workshops will be offered at no cost to participants.

“It is unacceptable that women in Pennsylvania are still making just 80 cents on the dollar compared to what a man makes, and there are far too many employers who refuse to even acknowledge the gender pay gap, much less work to eliminate it,” said Gov. Tom Wolf. “Women deserve equal pay for equal work.”

In Pennsylvania, women working full time are paid just 80 cents for every dollar paid to a white male, and the gap is even wider for women of color. Since 2018, the Commission for Women has been working to advocate for legislative and policy changes to equal pay laws and business practices on a statewide level. Specifically, the commission joined first lady Frances Wolf to host a series of roundtable discussions on equal pay following Gov. Tom Wolf’s 2018 equal pay executive order for state employees.

The workshops will first be available in several locations across the state, including Wednesday, Oct. 16, at King’s College, and Tuesday, Nov. 19 at the University of Scranton.

Jimmy Martinez, 32, was stopped at Locust and 10th streets by two Hazleton police officers, who determined that the car Martinez was driving had expired registration.

Upon approaching the vehicle, officers spotted a baggie of alleged marijuana. Martinez was removed from the vehicle and placed in police custody.

Martinez was also driving while under a license suspension due to a prior driving under the influence offense.

LUZERNE — Seven-year-old twins, Amelia and Sophia Nesgoda were eager to show off their blue tongues after eating cotton candy at the Luzerne Fall Festival on Saturday.

The sisters and their family, of Edwardsville, were one of the hundreds that strolled down Main Street and enjoyed the sights, sounds, and tastes of the 24th annual festival, sponsored by the Luzerne Merchants Association.

“People love the festival,” said Jeff Mullen, the president of the Luzerne Merchants Association and owner of Main Optical.

People start to ask about the fall festival in July, Karen Brown, vice president of the Luzerne Merchants Association and owner of My Sister’s Closet, said.

Amelia and Sophia attend every year with their family, their parents Nicole and Rich Nesgoda said. The sisters’ favorite activities are playing in the bouncy inflatable houses, eating snow cones and cotton candy.

A variety of vendors, including Michael’s Farm Market, Rescue Warriors Cat Rescue, Village Pet Supplies, and Frontier Girls Troop 193 lined Main Street.

The band, I Am Buffalo, entertained the public outside of Coal City Tavern at 1 p.m. While radio station, Gem 104, had feet tapping on the opposite end of Main Street.

Louann Polacheck of Forty Fort enjoyed browsing the vendors and seeing all the shops in downtown Luzerne.

Polacheck did find a fall rag wreath at Project DJ’s tent. Project DJ is a nonprofit group who meets at the Trucksville United Methodist Church in Trucksville. The group makes quilts for sick children in area hospitals.

Proceeds from Saturday’s sales go toward purchasing materials, thread, batting for quilts, Jenny Vesloski, a member of Project DJ said.

“We have donated over 12,000 quilts to 19 hospitals,” Lisa Guerrero, a member of Project DJ said.

The fall festival also gives the Luzerne Merchants Association a chance to showcase the growing town and revitalized Main Street.

Some of the newer Main Street businesses include ReRuns, a consignment shop, and Inspire Health & Fitness, according to Mullen.

“I have 18 (rental) units,” he said. “Fourteen are on Main Street. I have a waiting list of business who want a spot downtown.”

The community’s and borough’s support for local businesses combined with the active merchant’s association has made Luzerne’s downtown vibrant, Brown said.

The merchants association will shine a spotlight on Main Street again on Oct. 12 with the annual Creep Walk, Mullen said.

HAZLETON — Police are seeking a man that they believe was erratically operating a motorcycle through the streets of Hazleton.

On Friday at about 7:20 p.m., officers were notified that a driver on a blue and white Yamaha motorcycle was driving recklessly at high rates of speed through the city. This wasn’t the first time that this motorcycle has been spotted driving erratically through Hazleton, as reports of the same bike riding recklessly at Fun Fest also were brought to police.

Officers pursued the motorcycle and managed to locate the driver attempting to push the bike in the area of 10th and Locust streets, but the driver took off on foot. Police were unable to locate the driver.

“We will hold the motorcycle and continue to aggressively stop the nuisance created by these off-road ATV’s and motorcycles,” said Hazleton police Chief Jerry Speziale in the release.

The Times Leader’s Fall Career Fair is set for 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. this Tuesday, Sept. 17 at Genetti’s in downtown Wilkes-Barre.

“We are excited that we have more local employers at this career fair than past fairs, offering a wide range of positions,” said Times Leader Media Group Vice President of Sales and Marketing Kerry O’Neil Miscavage.

Job hunters can catch a sneak peek in the special section that can be found with the inserts inside Sunday’s edition.

WILKES-BARRE — Justin Correll and Martha Zabriski were celebrating 25 years of friendship on Saturday night — in a big way.

The two turned the benchmark into an opportunity to raise money to establish the NEPA Pride Humanitarian Scholarship at an event that drew nearly 500 people to Genetti’s Princess Room for an inaugural gala that offered food, entertainment and fun.

The Gayla NEPA 2019 geared to the LGBTQ community was aimed at providing a night of “food, fun and fabulousness,” and by all accounts it did just that.

Correll emphasized that the event supported a scholarship program awarded to an LGBTQ individual or ally enrolled in a college program studying any aspect of the arts.

Both Correll and Zabriski said they were overwhelmed with public response to the event which sold out early and was well sponsored.

Both were also grateful for dozens of donated gift baskets which provided a chance to win everything from a tattoo to spa services to a night on the town.

A favorite part of the event, he said, was the presentation of the Sally Healy Community Impact Award. Healey passed away earlier this year after a life known for education and public service.

“She was one of the first members of the community impact team and we’re so glad we can honor her,” he said.

Chris Lafrance, Luzerne, said he came out to support a good cause while spending a night out filled with food, fellowship and entertainment.

Lafrance was with his boyfriend, who traveled from New York for a night on the town and a unique event.

Wendy Cominsky, an event organizer, said the event reflected growing community support for the LGBTQ and its next generation.

Organizers, she said, are already looking forward to next year’s Gayla, with a theme of “Roaring Twenties, the Great ‘Gay’tsby Party.

Jacinta and Seana Barnes, Wilkes-Barre, standing in the midst of a multitude of color and glitter which defined the evening, said they were looking forward to spending time with friends.

Chris Salvo, Wilkes-Barre, said he would have come out to the event even if it wasn’t LGBTQ related.

“It’s a chance to raise money to help young people,” he said. “And, I think that’s the great part about it.”

Mayoral candidate George Brown who had attended the multicultural festival earlier in the day, said both the festival and the Gayla reflected the city’s commitment to diversity and community.

WILKES-BARRE — Wilkes-Barre was filled with the color, sounds and flavors of a variety of cultures and ethnicities Saturday at the city’s third annual Multicultural Festival.

The event kicked off on Saturday morning with a parade that included entries from local colleges, churches, diversity groups and city offices.

Following the parade and reflecting the cooperative nature of the event, current Mayor Tony George and mayoral candidate George Brown warmly greeted each other and took time to share a few words as they stood at Public Square. Brown said he would be making some changes when he took office in January, but that the annual event would not be one of them. “This is a great idea, I plan to continue it,” he said. “It’s a positive thing for the betterment of the community.”

Brown said his children had given him an ancestry kit for Christmas and he found out that he’s German, Irish, British and French.

Russell Young, who moved to the area from Lehighton in 2017, said he was enjoying the color and music of the parade.

Young said he enjoyed the diversity of the community, its stellar police department, emergency services and public works department, and the good spirit of his neighbors.

Jesus Rios and Daniel Rivera from Wilkes-University Panamanian program, who walked and danced in the parade, said they were enjoying the energy of the festival and looking forward to sampling a variety of ethnic foods.

King’s College Diversity Club students who participated in the parade, were also taking time to get to know other participants, as well as to sample ethnic foods.

For those with a sweet tooth, Susan Porcucek, Wilkes-Barre, was on hand offering old-fashioned penny candy which include Swedish fish, “dots” and other sweet standards.

Candy seems to have universal appeal, she said, as she waited on young customers whose parents were sharing memories about the hard-to-find treats.

Maria Anderscavage, Luzerne, said she came out to the festival with her family because some of children were taking Spanish and were preparing for upcoming projects for the class.

Maryann Kearon, Wilkes-Barre, said she thought the parade was a reflection of the city’s upward trend.

“More businesses, more coffee shops, more restaurants,” she said. “The city is moving forward.” Many of those attending said they were grateful that the rain held off and enjoying the moderate temperatures.

HAZLETON — Police are actively searching for a man that they believe was involved in a shooting that took place back in May.

Kevin Polanco-Perez, 21, of Hazleton is wanted by authorities for the nonfatal shooting of a male at the Altmiller Playground back on May 24.

Police believe that this shooting is one that led to retaliatory shootings in response, including one from July on Laurel Street. Christopher Paniagua was arrested earlier this month in connection to that shooting.

Polanco-Perez is considered armed and dangerous and faces charges on two counts of reckless endangerment, two counts of simple assault and a count of recklessly endangering another person.

“It’s in the best interest of Mr. Polanco-Perez to turn himself in immediately, as we will work with our federal, state and county law enforcement partners nationally to capture him and insure he faces justice,” said police Chief Jerry Speziale in a news release Saturday.

Anyone with information leading to Polanco-Perez’s whereabouts is encouraged to call the Hazleton Police Department at 570-501-7218.

DALLAS TWP. — No, Dr. Paul Grundy is not a “godfather” a la Don Corleone, making people offers they can’t refuse. Then again, he did spearhead an effort to make health care providers revamp their systems by giving them a sort of “or else” scenario when he worked at IBM, so, maybe a bit of Corleone?

Dubbed by some as the godfather of the patient-centered medical home movement, Grundy will be the keynote speaker at Misericordia University’s 10th annual Health Care Symposium on Oct. 18. Odds are he’ll relate the story of his time as IBM global director of health care transformation when he helped line up 47 of the Fortune 100 companies to try to leverage health care providers to reset the way they did things.

“We brought a set of principles. We wanted them to buy into a covenant change, between the providers and the buyers of care,” Grundy said in a phone interview. The leverage: The companies would stop doing business with providers who didn’t shift from treating patients solely after they became sick to managing the population with an eye on reducing the need for treatment down the road.

The idea of a more holistic approach to health care, and for a team approach of different providers seeing the same patient, is not so new these days, but was pretty radical 15 years ago, when the IBM effort started. And Grundy is quick to praise Misericordia’s health care programs for stressing the patient-centric approach, training the people who can take up some of the duties of a physician, including therapists, physician assistants and nurse practitioners.

The physician, Grundy said, should be free to “deal with the difficult diagnostic dilemmas.” Other should deal with the broader patient issues, and Misericordia is training those “others.”

Grundy likens the change he is seeking to the time, centuries ago, when a single master builder would be in charge of making a prominent structure such as a cathedral. Now, he notes, a team of architects, engineers and others are brought on board to work together.

Similarly, he said, medicine has become to complex to expect one doctor to be up on all the developments and determine what is best in all situations. “We need to move away from the idea of the doctor being the center of the universe to the patient being the center of the universe”.

Grundy also talks of evolving from the “information age,” to the “intelligence age,” where information is not only compiled and analyzed but used, in part through artificial intelligence programs, to better manage the health of whole populations. It could be as simple as a machine reminding patients (and doctors) it’s time for a specific test.

Grundy is the founding president of the Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative, and chief transformation officer at Innovaccer. After his presentation, he will hold a book sale and signing for the new book, “Trusted Healers: Dr. Paul Grundy and the Global Healthcare Quest.’’ Written by Dan Pelino and Bud Ramey, which includes insights from Grundy and other health care visionaries, according to a media release.

The symposium runs from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Lemmond Theater in Walsh Hall. Admission is free, but seating is limited so registration is required. Visit www.misericordia.edu/healthevent to register.

Municipalities in Luzerne County will receive a combined $113,900 in license fees from the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board.

In a news release Monday, the PLCB said it will distribute more than $2.4 million to 1,379 municipalities. Over the last five fiscal years, the PLCB returned $22.4 million in licensing fees to local municipalities.

“Twice a year, as required by law, the PLCB returns a portion of liquor license fees paid by PLCB-approved licensees to the municipalities that are home to those liquor licenses. Municipalities have flexibility in allocating and spending the returned license fees to meet local needs,” the PLCB said.

The funds were from the period of Feb. 1 to July 31 of this year. In all, 56 cities, 551 boroughs, and 772 townships will receive payments ranging from $25 to $395,375.

Statewide there are more than 15,000 retail liquor licenses that includes restaurants, clubs, and hotels. Licensees pay fees ranging from $125 to $700.The amount depends on the type of license and the population of the municipality in which the license is located.

WHITE HAVEN — The executive branch of state government handed down the decision to close the White Haven State Center, while a bipartisan group of lawmakers from the legislative branch are gearing up to challenge […]

WILKES-BARRE — Frank Bartoli, executive director at NEPA Inclusive, has worked for years to create and support inclusive and sustainable lives for people with disabilities. Bartoli said the White Haven State Center is an institution […]

WILKES-BARRE — Who wants to share a sardine sandwich with me? Or a stick of pepperoni? Or some oyster stew? These are just a few of my dad’s favorite snacks back in the day. Oh […]

WILKES-BARRE — The Wolf administration announced last week that it has received $20 million in federal funding from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to continue the Money Follows the Person (MFP) grant. MFP […]

HAZLETON — A traffic stop led to a drug arrest in Hazleton on Friday night. According to a Hazleton police news release: Jimmy Martinez, 32, was stopped at Locust and 10th streets by two Hazleton […]

LUZERNE — Seven-year-old twins, Amelia and Sophia Nesgoda were eager to show off their blue tongues after eating cotton candy at the Luzerne Fall Festival on Saturday. The sisters and their family, of Edwardsville, were […]

HAZLETON — Police are seeking a man that they believe was erratically operating a motorcycle through the streets of Hazleton. According to a news release issued Saturday: On Friday at about 7:20 p.m., officers were […]

WILKES-BARRE — Looking for a job or change in career? The Times Leader’s Fall Career Fair is set for 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. this Tuesday, Sept. 17 at Genetti’s in downtown Wilkes-Barre. “We are […]

WILKES-BARRE — Justin Correll and Martha Zabriski were celebrating 25 years of friendship on Saturday night — in a big way. The two turned the benchmark into an opportunity to raise money to establish the […]

WILKES-BARRE — Wilkes-Barre was filled with the color, sounds and flavors of a variety of cultures and ethnicities Saturday at the city’s third annual Multicultural Festival. The event kicked off on Saturday morning with a […]

HAZLETON — Police are actively searching for a man that they believe was involved in a shooting that took place back in May. Kevin Polanco-Perez, 21, of Hazleton is wanted by authorities for the nonfatal […]

DALLAS TWP. — No, Dr. Paul Grundy is not a “godfather” a la Don Corleone, making people offers they can’t refuse. Then again, he did spearhead an effort to make health care providers revamp their […]

WILKES-BARRE — Who wants to share a sardine sandwich with me? Or a stick of pepperoni? Or some oyster stew? These are just a few of my dad’s favorite snacks back in the day. Oh […]

WILKES-BARRE — The Wolf administration announced last week that it has received $20 million in federal funding from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to continue the Money Follows the Person (MFP) grant. MFP […]

Have you ever refused an apology? It’s an unnerving place to be. Some of us are more at ease cheating on our taxes, getting into a bar fight or leaving an occasional spouse than withholding […]

Diamonds to Wilkes-Barre for staging today’s multicultural parade and festival, and if you are reading this early enough and live close enough, consider heading downtown. The parade begins 11 a.m. and runs from the intersection […]

Just over four decades ago, The Citizens’ Voice was founded by union members. Recently, The Citizen’s Voice told 840 union members and their families that closing SCI-Retreat and White Haven Center is somehow for the […]

Many of the candidates seeking nomination for the presidency are advocating for “free college.” With 44.2 million Americans owing $1.52 million in student loans and college costs continuing to increase, it is easy to see […]

The Plymouth Township Board of Supervisors would like to thank all the residents for their calls and support on the very difficult decision that had to be made about our volunteer fire company. Unfortunately, sometimes […]

There are times when we all need a reminder of the intrinsic good in our fellow human beings. In all honesty, some days you won’t find that in the pages of your daily newspaper or […]

Everyone who knows me, knows I’m a homebody. It’s hard to get me to leave my cocoon, except for runs to CVS for my Hot Tamales and Target for my Depends, but even I realized […]

WASHINGTON — The strangest thing about President Trump’s aborted plan to fly the Taliban to Camp David wasn’t the terrible symbolism of hosting terrorists three days before the anniversary of 9/11 — although that was […]

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Sept. 11, 2001. If you were old enough to remember that day, it’s certainly one you will never forget, not even if you lived five lifetimes. The first thing that stands out is how gorgeous […]

For the first time ever, I agree with President Donald Trump’s campaign manager. Brad Parscale, who looks like an overzealous community theater understudy for the role of Lucifer, only creepier, said over the weekend he […]

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